JAMES HENRY REED

                      &

         Alan Jabbour

Learning Henry Reed's music is also learning about the man who sought old-time Appalachian musicians and devoted his life to learning and sharing their music.  That man is Alan Jabbour (1942 - 2017).   Henry (1884 - 1868) was in his 80's when Alan "discovered" him.  Reed had lived all his life in Giles County, Virginia.  The many, many recordings of Henry's fiddle became the foundation for a group called the Hollow Rock Stringband which were based in Durham and Chapel Hill, North Carolina in the 1960's -- the hotbed for old-time music.  Alan was fundamental in preserving music in the Library of Congress, available for anyone to search on-line today.  The old tunes Reed had learned from his family are included in the staples of old-time music today.  Here is a small sampling, arranged by me for clawhammer banjo with tabs available on this site.

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Quince Dillon, Civil War fifer

Henry Reed knew Quince Dillon as an elderly fiddler, and learned tunes from him that were pre-Civil War.  Henry in turn passed them on to a young Alan Jabbour. Now the music is passed around by today's old-time musicians.  There's even a Henry Reed Memorial Festival 

held once a year, boosted by its founder Chris Via and his family and neighbors for the past 16 years.

         Henry Reed Tunes